Print Grant Hewitt

1.  PLAN
Failure to plan is planning to fail.  Create a game plan for how you’re going to tackle parties and your activity during the holidays.  Doing what everyone else is doing is rarely a wise pattern, 68% of Americans being overweight should clue us in.  Among the things to plan for, physical activity needs to be present no matter what.  Fill your plate with high-volume low-calorie foods first. Et cetera.

Though people who push food in your face usually mean well, that doesn’t mean they’re well informed.  Don’t let others derail you from staying on track.  Let them know that taking care of yourself is a priority for you this Christmas season.

2.  KNOW that tomorrow never comes
“I’ll get serious tomorrow”.  “I’ll start a diet on Monday” This kind of procrastination is killing us.  We need to be those who take responsibility in the moment, to push away from the table, turn down the sixth helping of pie, to not stop exercising just because “family is in town”.

New Years’ resolutions are great, but how about a resolve not to play the same unhealthy see-saw game every year?  Yes, the food around this time of the year is fun!  Snacking on cookies and goodies is very enjoyable.  We’re so used to it.  Yet, when the new year hits, we regret our indiscretions and are on the familiar hunt for a quick-fix diet.

If tomorrow never comes, then neither will the results you want.

3.  BELIEVE that this is a health issue!
We’re not just talking about another couple of pounds, we are talking about a few pounds every year that never ultimately come off.  Research continues to indicate that the few pounds we put on over the holidays just accumulates over the years, spiraling us into more obesity.  Excess weight causes a host of health problems, not the least of which are diabetes, depression and joints that won’t stop aching.  The one day is never the problem.  The holidays essentially turn into 2 months of overeating.  Between leftovers, parties and various social gatherings, we manufacture all sorts of reasons why these are special occasions and warrant a little “splurge” here and there.  Some of these reasons are legitimate, but sooner or later we need to ask: How’s that “splurging” working out for you?

4.  STOP making excuses
There’s no question that the holidays present some of the most sustained and unhealthy challenges of the year.  However, we are simply experts at making excuses for why this habitual overeating and inactivity is OK.  If you are reading this it means you probably care enough about your health to stop the jibber-jabber, and get moving in the right direction – Get outside, get the junk out of the house, stay out of the kitchen. 

“Do, or do not.  There is no try” – Yoda



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